The Origin Of Watch Night Service

The origin of watch night worship service has been well documented and published.  For many of you, what I am about to share is not new information.   Nevertheless, in keeping with the spirit of this blog to dispel myths and illuminate truth, I have chosen to share the following historical facts:

The Origin Of Watch Night Service

There are two essential reasons for the importance of New Year’s Eve services in African American congregations. Many of the Watch Night Services in Black communities that we celebrate today can be traced back to gatherings on December 31, 1862, also known as “Freedom’s Eve.” On that night, Americans of African descent came together in churches, gathering places and private homes throughout the nation, anxiously awaiting news that the Emancipation Proclamation had become law. Then, at the stroke of midnight, it was January 1, 1863, and according to Lincoln’s promise, all slaves in the Confederate States were legally free. People remained in churches and other gathering places, eagerly awaiting word that Emancipation had been declared. When the actual news of freedom was received later that day, there were prayers, shouts and songs of joy as people fell to their knees and thanked God.

But even before 1862 and the possibility of a Presidential Emancipation, African slaves had gathered on New Year’s Eve on plantations across the South. That is because many owners of enslaved Africans tallied up their business accounts on the first day of each new year. Human property was sold along with land and furnishings to satisfy debts. Families and friends were separated. Often they never saw each other again in this earthly world. Thus coming together on December 31 might be the last time for enslaved and free Africans to be together with loved ones.

So, Black folks in the United States have gathered annually on New Year’s Eve since the earliest days, praising God for bringing us safely through another year and praying for the future. Certainly, those traditional gatherings were made even more poignant by the events of 1863 which brought freedom to the slaves and the Year of Jubilee. Since those early days, many generations have passed and most of us were never taught the African American history of Watch Night. Yet our traditions and our faith still bring us together at the end of every year to celebrate once again how God delivered His children out of the hands of their tormentors.

Please consider incorporating this Watch Night Service history into your Watch Night Service.

Happy New Year!

Copyright © Othealor W. Prince 2011
All Rights Reserved

TO GOD BE THE GLORY!!!

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